IS INTERNATIONAL CRICKET TOO GUNG HO?

It was interesting to watch the contrast in batting approaches across the international cricket matches on view today.

At one end of the scale we saw England lose eight wickets and score eight runs inside nineteen deliveries too lose the third T20 international by 75 runs. At the other end of the scale we saw Faf du Plessis and David Miller put together a one hundred and seventeen run partnership to propel South Africa from 108-4 too 225-5, which laid the foundation for a total of 307-6.

Although the new brand of one day cricket is to be attacking and exciting at all times and to try and score as many runs as you can whilst taking as little time as possible to get yourself in, the question begs to be asked that has the art of digging in gone away from limited overs cricket?

When an Australia or a New Zealand or even this young, dynamic England side come out all guns blazing and put close to four-hundred on the board in limited overs cricket, it all looks very good for the game. The worrying thing is when it doesn’t come off which has become regular on pitches that should not cause as many problems as they are causing. The application of batting is a lot to be desired across International cricket and to see du Plessis and Miller apply it today was very refreshing.

Of course, there is always a time and a place to play a certain way and no player should ever delve away from their natural game but sometimes it is okay to bide your time in One-Day cricket, and just catch up later. You never know a hundred struck at under a run a ball in a one day innings could still be the innings that wins the game for the team.

IS INTERNATIONAL CRICKET TOO GUNG HO?

King Kane

At a time where the Cricketing world is understandably mesmerised by the talents on Virat Kohli after his stellar year, have the talents of Kane Williamson gone under the radar?

  In 2016, Williamson averaged 47.06 in Test Match Cricket, 41.11 in One Day Internationals and remarkably, 47.87 in T20 Internationals. In contrast to Kohli, Williamson is way below the Indian captain’s 2016 numbers but the question still remains, how is  Williamson so underrated?

I use the word underrated because when the best batsman in the  world are spoken off, people talk about Kohli (with good reason), Steven Smith and Joe Root (also with good reason) but for some reason, Williamson does not gain the recognition deserved – especially outside of New Zealand.

On Monday, Williamson scored 104 from 90 balls to lead New Zealand to a win. He led them to win a game where his side had conceded 595 runs in the first innings and saw a deficit of 56 runs after his own side had batted. A day earlier, Kohli had scored 122 to help his Indian side chase down 350 in an ODI against England. Though both these were admirable feats, Kohli’s sheer superstar status earned him the recognition his effort deserved whilst Williamson’s effort seemed undervalued by everyone anywhere apart from New Zealand.

I guess the point of this post is to just pat Kane Williamson on the back and to say I am a massive fan, I hope he continues Brendan McCullum’s legacy with New Zealand and that he treats the world to more batting masterclasses. World Cricket is blessed with many great batsman at the minute and Williamson is up there with them all.

King Kane